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  1. 7 points
    Blober

    Dr Roberts, I presume?

    A small report, these are from a good few years back now i'm sure. Taken on an old Lubitel 166B using magnesium ribbon to illuminate the pictures. Low tech eh? The working of slate at Conglog began in 1854 with a two-year take-note to Robert Roberts, Surgeon and John Williams, quarryman, of Ffestiniog. It continued under a number of leases and sub-lettings, and under several different trading names, until 1909. The new Conglog Slate and Slab Co Ltd went into liquidation in 1891, and a new leaseholder from 1895 traded as the Glyn Ffestiniog Quarry. The complex includes four open pits leading to underground levels and chambers in the Back Vein and North Vein. The "shard" Illuminating the big slab This one is similar to above but illuminated down the passage with some fancy electronic torch. The slab and waste wagon And one more of the waste wagon As you can see lots of heroic posing is involved in mine exploring. Hopefully you found this a bit interesting, now the others can't complain at me for not posting reports.
  2. 6 points
    THE HISTORY:- Opened on 8 August 1910 by the London and North Western Railway, Manchester Mayfield was built alongside Manchester London Road station (later Piccadilly) to handle the increased number of trains and passengers following the opening of the Styal Line in 1909. The LNWR had considered constructing a new platform at London Road between the MSJAR's Platforms 1 and 2, which were renumbered 1 and 3 in anticipation, but this was abandoned in favour of the construction of Mayfield; the platforms nevertheless remained renumbered. Four platforms were provided and passengers could reach London Road via a high-level footbridge. Mayfield suffered the effects of bombing during World War II, when it was hit by a parachute mine on 22 December 1940. Mayfield was a relief station mainly used by extra trains and suburban services to the south of Manchester. For example, in the 1957-58 London Midland Region timetable there were trains to Cheadle Hulme, Buxton, Alderley Edge, Chelford and Stockport on weekdays. In the London Midland timetable of September 1951, the Pines Express from Bournemouth West is shown as arriving at Mayfield at 4.30pm (16.30) on Mondays to Fridays. On Saturdays this train used Piccadilly station, then known as London Road. In the 1957-8 timetable, the Pines Express still arrived at Mayfield on Mondays to Fridays, now at the time of 4.45pm (16.45). It came into its own for a brief period during the electrification and modernisation of what was to become Piccadilly Station in the late 1950s, when many services were diverted to it. It was closed to passengers on 28 August 1960. The site was converted into a parcels depot which opened on 6 July 1970. Royal Mail constructed a sorting office on the opposite side of the main line and connected it to Mayfield with an overhead conveyor bridge which crossed the throat of Piccadilly Station. The depot closed in 1986 following the decision by Parcelforce, Royal Mail's parcels division, to abandon rail transport in favour of road haulage. The building has remained disused ever since, with the tracks into Mayfield removed in 1989 as part of the remodelling of the Piccadilly Station layout. The sorting office was briefly reused as an indoor karting track, but has now been rebuilt as the Square One development, prestige offices used by Network Rail; the parcel conveyor bridge was removed in 2003. The site is currently the property of London and Continental Railways. The interior of the station was used in Prime Suspect as a drug dealer's haunt. It was also used as a double for Sheffield railway station in The Last Train. The roadside building was gutted by a fire in 2005. THE VISIT:- This was a permission tour. a great chance to visit the station without fear of death! reflections.... recently used the station yard as a food festival. under the platforms two massive spaces. loading ramp to the platforms come and play poster!!! bit of graff in next street.
  3. 6 points
    Snapt

    Competition 3 "Stairs 'n' Chairs"

    Hi peeps. After a week of discussion we are delighted to announce that Mr WB's spiral staircase has won this themed competition. A huge thank you to everyone that took part in the competition.
  4. 6 points
    Lavino

    Piano theatre, London November 2017

    A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in the west of Greater London. The piano theatre was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The piano Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 08CAA57C-13D7-487C-8831-A9B5DADF2598 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  5. 5 points
    Bovine

    Gassy

    This secluded 35 hectare site is at the bottom of the River Alyn valley in North Wales. In 1939 the land was purchased by the Ministry of Supply and developed as a purpose built chemical weapons factory and storage facility. Over 100 specialised buildings were constructed across the site, linked by an extensive rail network established around a spur off the Chester to Denbigh mainline. Other major landscaping undertaken at this time included the canalisation and culverting of the River Alyn, and the excavation of a complex of interlinked subterranean, rock-cut tunnels and caverns. During World War II the plant produced ordnance containing mustard gas, and was associated with the development of the Atom Bomb. In the immediate Post-War period the site was used to store German nerve gas, and it was not until the 1950s when Britain relinquished its chemical weapons (CW) capability that the site as a chemical storage facility was defunct. However, the site remains on the international Chemical Weapons List, and is still monitored as such. From the mid-1960s the site was used by various governmental departments, its major function being a buffer storage depot to supply emergency rations and foodstuffs, and associated facilities such as mobile bakeries and canteens. In 1994 the site was closed, and a programme of demolition was undertaken. This involved the dropping of buildings onto their footprints, and the rubble being mounded over with topsoil. Several major structures, and many ancillary buildings, still survive across the site. It is now developed as a nature reserve, but still restricted access. All sorts of empty structures Remains of incoming 3 phase electric supply Relic of some safety equipment? Toxic burial pit, not eating that fruit! To store the shells, local miners dug vast underground caverns with well sealed entrances! The other side of the door! a grid of passages The grids led to sumps, from where the water was pumped into the river below. A sump, less gratings, plus fencing by DEFRA A spring was hit in digging one passage, the water is just visible above the tank Buildings and mounded rubble all over the site Buildings stripped bare A relic of the past The rail platform for loading shells, several sections of track remain in places, embedded in concrete The platform and paths were asphalted, to reduce the chances of something going off if dropped! Nature is reclaiming its own! Thanks for looking.
  6. 4 points
    So this is going to be my first report on this site. I would do one on 28dayslater as well as usual but someone reported on it only a day ago and I don't feel like typing it out twice.. P.S If any members could tell me how the chatbox works on here, would be much appreciated History: The mill was built in 1907, as another cotton-spilling based mill that gave Oldham the industrial capital name at the time. However this mill was unusual because it was powered by a steam enginewhich gave 1500hp, capable of spinning 120,000 spindles. The mill was expanded constantly due to the countries need for cotton, once in 1920, and in 1924. The cotton demand got so high the depression caused a lot of factory closures and many workers to leave the industry. During WW2, there was a brief reprive for Hartford as the factory produced cotton for war clothes, but by the mid-1950s the industry fell into trouble once again. This and competition from overseas caused Hartford into a long, slow decline, finally ending production in 1959. From then, the mill was used by Littlewoods multiple services up until 1992, and then shut down for good. The buildings have been derelict since. Our visit: After a number of explores and fails around the centre of Oldham, we progressed around it's rim and found this one, that's been on the list for a while but never really made the trip, unless there was something else worthwhile in the area. From what I've heard there's been multiple fires here and a teenager fell to his death so I was very surprised to see it completely unsealed. Inside it was quite interesting, more the higher you got. And no, before you ask, the engine house isn't available, all sealed for some reason, unlike the rest of the building. Pictures: Take a look, would usually be a video afterwards but the file got corrupted for some bizarre reason... The front, looks like that tower used to have a dome on it's top. Outside engine house, it was pouring with rain which is the weird effect. Looking up at the huge chimney. https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4532/37993157605_b658a306ba_b.jpg[/img Large vent. Water dripping... Rest of the shots are just views. There isn't really much to see inside, anyway, glad we came at sunset. Manchester in fog. Thanks for reading. Have a good one
  7. 4 points
    Visited with @albinojay and @GK_WAX a early start to our first location only to rock up and find security parked up with his dog. Tried to sweet talk our way in but he was having non of it. So head back calling at other locations including Uncle Bobs mill. What a top place this is loads to see including the security sat in there hut Lolz. Spent a good few hours here and it was pissing down so we was onto a winner. Here’s some history and photos.. The history of Uncle Bobsr mill dates back to the industrial revolution. The company was once owned by Ralph Crompton and Nephews, producers and bleachers of paper. Their first mill was located in Stoneclough, Manchester. The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Uncle Bob, the mill’s manager at the time. Bob had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Bobs death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era. Untitled by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/ZBZxmc][/url]Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/ZT2iwo][/url]Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr Fletchers by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  8. 4 points
    Snapt

    Special Needs

    Crikey it was a bitterly cold morning, a sign that winter was definately around the corner as I pulled up down a quiet street. There, lurking in the shadows was my partner in crime. Not that he was recognisable, I've never seen so many layers on a human being before. A brief defrost in the car and we were off into the darkness. As well as the weather being fresh the derp was too, as we fund out so were the electrics, including the alarm system. However, we were in and we weren't going to leave. The school was, as much as I could discover, a residential school for pupils with needs outside the mainstream educational system. The school in particular has enjoyed good Ofsted reports but has courted controversy too. A highly publicised court case with claims of abuse blighted the earlier good reports. According to reports the school has been closed a number of years which I find surprising as the general condition inside is very good. I believe it was used as some sort of Police training building after closure, which makes sense as the place is a maze of corridors and rooms. As we were finishing our explore we encountered secca, we'd known they'd been on site within 15 minutes of the alarms going off. Luckily we'd been able to continue our explore and were only caught leaving, we declined an invitation to hang out for a while and left. Thanks for looking, a great explore and a good laugh to do. Light Corridor by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Heat by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Residential School by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Dorms by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Bedrooms by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Toilets by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Police Line by Richard Ashton, on Flickr School Room by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Car Room by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Light Room by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Accomodation by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Shower by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Cat by Richard Ashton, on Flickr The Hall by Richard Ashton, on Flickr Kitchen by Richard Ashton, on Flickr A few more on the flickr.
  9. 4 points
    HairyTomato

    Hotel Derpafornia.

    Well, its been a while since Iv posted, not got a lot of time on my hands but managed to get out today to somewhere nearby too me. So some info and iPhone pictures follow (sorry if its been done recently, couldn't find it on here anyhow). The Hotel Derpafornia is based on proposals drawn-up in January 1907 by George Walton (Architect), a Glasgow School architect and contemporary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh.[1]The proposals were subsequently revised in 1908, and the hotel was built in 1910.[1] The Hotel has five storeys and a basement. The height of the Hotel was disguised by having the upper three floors included in a giant mansard with rows of dormers.[2] The Hotel reflects skilled craftsmanship, in the handling of materials and detail, that echoes Walton's earlier design for Wern Fawr (now Coleg Harlech).[1] Wern Fawr has been described as being "at the apex of building craft" andhas been described as Walton "at his most professional".[1] At Derpafornia, Walton provided solutions to a challenging commercial design brief that included the traditional use of heavy masonry on the exterior of the Hotel, which was intended to reflect the use of this material in the locality.[1] In conjunction with this, Walton used reinforced concrete to open-up the interiors in order to simplify structural problems, make the most of the sea views, and give the interior "a cheerfulness which could survive even a dull Harlech day".[1] The Hotel was built for a syndicate, in which George Walton was involved, and catered primarily for golfers visiting the adjacent Royal St David's Golf Club. The Hotel has been used by generations of golfers[2] and other visitors to Harlech, who retain fond memories.[5] The Hotel had 60 bedrooms and served traditional home-cooked food, facilities included an early twentieth-century lift (elevator), a snooker table, an outdoor pool, and a solarium. Fire In 1922, a devastating fire destroyed the interior of the Hotel, so that Walton's original design commission has been lost.[1] The Hotel was then rebuilt hurriedly by Griffith Morris. The three bay centre is now flanked by two storeys of stone, two of roughcast and the attic only is mansarded. The centre has also been altered on the top two floors and has a ground floor addition.[2] It is unclear from the records how much of the original interior structure has survived. The later, low quality, extensions have diminished the grand aspect of Walton's original structure. Despite this, the Hotel is retained in Cadw's listing description for Coleg Harlech, which is a Grade II* Listed Building, and this suggests that the Hotel was notable due to its group value.
  10. 3 points
    Bovine

    Cyprus Delights

    Copper mining in Cyprus started in about 300BC, in fact the name is derived from cuprous (copper). The early prospectors found the copper ore by looking for 'gossans' or iron domes in the hills. These were formed when a vein is exposed on the surface, leaching of the soluble copper elements into the vein, leaving iron oxides which form reddish, yellow or brown hills. Most mining was done by digging gigantic holes to get at the ore, but a few were proper mines, due to the depth of the overburden. Usually inclined adits, they were worked by pillar and stall, or face advancement. The area explored even had a narrow gauge (2foot 6 gauge) railway some 8 miles long to convey the ore to the port, where it was concentrated prior to shipment. There is not that much information available, but the following is an extract from a mining report. The mining area of Kalavasos covers a range of 18 square kilometres, the centre of which is located north of the Kalavasos village, about 10 kilometres from the Vasiliko beach and around 13 kilometres from the ancient city of Amathous. The ore from the Kalavasos mines was transferred via railway to the harbour of Vasiliko. Processing took place in the factory that existed there and then -through a system of overhead loading -it was loaded onto ships to be exported. The aggregate volume of reserves in the deposits of the Kalavasos's area were calculated by professor L. Mousoulos to be approximately 8.5 million tones. The ore production in the Kalavasos region started in 1937 and ended in 1978. A total of 5.5 million tones of ore were mined in the region during that period, while the export of ore by the mines of Kalavasos during the same period surpass 3 million tones. Today the mines remain shut and abandoned. The Community Council of Kalavasos has scheduled the maintenance of the entrance of the Mousoulou mine so that the visitors will observe how the mines operated. Explored with Mrs Bovine and a lot of frustration to find some of the mines!!! A 1976 shot of a train being marshalled at the mine A very rare underground pic, showing manpower to move the tubs! Preserved in the village is a loco and a selection of wagons on a bridge. Mrs Bovine shows the size of the wagons (note that her breed does not grow horns!) The steel frame reads "Appleby Frodingham England" Loading hoppers at the end of the line Still a bit of track left! Mine entrance complete with model church for the miners to pray for a safe shift. The sign says that is forbidden to enter the mine. Inside the adit, all the packing timbers are rotten and causing minor collapses, the floor is about a foot of ochre under the water! Death on a stick? That the mine entrance was banked up, causing it to half fill with water hasn't helped! Another mine, another adit! Just big enough for tubs And collapsing due to ground movement. Well worn rail as an anchor post Another one! The concrete is to protect from rocks breaking off the hillside above! Separate tracks for fulls and empties. A bit unsafe?????? This shows the steepness of the adit incline (whilst Mrs checks the travel insurance policy) Thanks for looking. Postscript - Who cleans up the mess? Ironstone (not wanted), various copper ore traces and the leachate is a form of ochre!
  11. 3 points
    porky pig

    HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE

    HISTORY:- The site is a theatre in Greater Manchester, England. The theatre officially opened 10 December 1900 . It has been used as many things a cinema theatre and was last in use as a bingo hall in 2008. The original capacity was 2,000 seated, this was increased to 3,000 in 1910 THE VISIT:- With the building being on a major street stealth mode had to be used (hard hat and hi vis!) the entry was a bit of a tight squeeze. The outside last used as a bingo hall. The Gods! this top part of the theatre was blocked off. some of the old seats view from the top The foyer View from the stage Bar Area. The ceiling. Cafe. We're watching you!! original seats from 1900. The entrance hall. tv Triffid!!!
  12. 3 points
    exploreswithkurt

    A Colliery Bathhouse

    So this location is basically on my doorstep and i've tried to get in a few times before but failed so i thought id give it one more shot and finally got in. i was so excited to explore this place and couldn't believe how stunning and photogenic the place from the wall tiles to the peely paint. the place it self is quite big and has around 3-4 floors i spent around 3 hours here because everywhere you look in this place is a photograph haha anyway ill give you all some history on the place then leave the pictures for last i hope you enjoyed the report the history Penallta Colliery was a coal mine, located close to Hengoed in the Rhymney Valley in the South Wales Valleys. A coal mine which in 1935 held the European record for coal wound in a 24-hour period, it is now the site of an original redevelopment project which will make use of the former pit head buildings. Situated near Hengoed, in 1905 Powell Duffryn began the sinking of Penallta colliery, and had employed 291 men by 1908. The two shafts Nos.1 (downcast 783 yards (716 m)) and 2 (upcast 750 yards (690 m)), and at the time were the deepest in the South Wales Coalfield. The first coal was raised in 1909, with the railway served by the Cylla branch which connected it to both the Rhymney Railway from the Ystrad Mynach north junction, and the Newport, Abergavenny and Hereford Railway. By 1923 there were 2,395 men employed, producing from the Six Feet seam, and at peak production during the 1930s, there were in excess of 3,200 men employed. In 1930 it produced 975,603 tons, and in 1935 it held the European record for coal winding. In 1947, the mine was nationalised as part of the governments post-World War II regeneration scheme, and became owned by the National Coal Board. Investment was made, and in the late 1940s a Meco-Moore Cutter Loader was installed, one of the first power loaders to be used in British mines, and as a result the Minister of Fuel and Power Hugh Gaitskell made a visit in December 1949. The colliery formed a rugby union club in 1952 called Penallta RFC, and in 1954 produced 500,000 tonnes of coal. During 1960 the shafts were extended to reach 800 yards as part of a scheme, which also included electrification of the shaft winding engines. But access to coal was becoming more difficult, and by the 1970s only 700 men were producing 210,000 tons yearly from the Lower Nine Feet and Seven Feet seams - both 20% of the figures at the height of production. The colliery survived the 1984-1985 miners strike, and made impressive gains in production after the return to work. But it was closed by British Coal on 1 November 1991 with the last shift led out by a brass band, the last deep mine working in the Rhymney Valley.
  13. 3 points
    "my bad" get you !!
  14. 2 points
    This base partnered with the gunnery was originally owned by MOD and specialized in training naval gunnery personnel in director sight firing. It was later used for radar research. Dr who filmed here in 1972. Upon commencement of the urban exploration of this abandoned Military Base in the UK we was very excited! I had no luck with entry anywhere all day then we finally made it inside! As we walked around this massive and magnificent building we did see a security hub and several security guards. Some wore high visibility jackets, some did not. But they were all beyond the sealed gate so we assumed. I did actually catch the voices on camera and even one guard, so look out for that. This was a stealth mission! We had to sneak around and evade the guards. I did have to stop sneaking and risk getting caught to stop and take in the beauty of this building. The long hallway and decayed walls were outstanding. The upstairs had suffered from heavy decay which was great! The downstairs was in better condition. Both floors displayed a gorgeous seaside view out of the many open windows, which were handy for knowing where security were. I heard a guard say over the walkie talkie that they were starting their perimeter patrol, which meant to me that they would only go round the outside. We heard someone walk up the stairs so we left via the other stairs opposite and decided it was time to go. BUT, when we got to our entrance, it had been fully blocked! Security boarded up the whole in the fence we climbed through and there was barbed wire across the top. Did we get out??? Find out by watching the full video above.
  15. 2 points
    A short cinematic film of Healey Mills train graveyard and Dudfleet Mill. Thanks for watching!
  16. 2 points
    Snapt

    The Sand Sidings

    This was like a return trip for me, a place I'd visited years before. I always enjoy going back to a place and seeing how much things change over time. The change in this place was rather stark, nearly the complete line that went from CVR to the Sand Sidings had now gone. More importantly, so had most of the trains and carriages. Such a shame, end of mooch. Well, not exactly. With little else to do that day, and a fine early autumn day it was too, I decided to walk the entire route from CVR to the Sand Sidings. A rather jolly and splendid little sojourn it was too. Still plenty to see and kept the interest going throughout the walk. As for history, there's really very little I know regarding the Sand Sidings. I know it outlasted the local train station at Oakamoor and closed around 1988 to freight trains. Since then it was used as storage for Churnet Valley Railway. The first time I went it was alive with activity with the track in use, it's now slowly being reclaimed by nature. Hope you enjoy and see my Flickr for more images of this mooch. RJA_5596 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5605 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5624 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5632 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5634 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5647 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5655 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5653 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5676 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5679 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5690 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5698 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5708 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr RJA_5710 by Richard Ashton, on Flickr
  17. 2 points
    porky pig

    LIGHTWAVES

    A Little Exhibition at media city.
  18. 2 points
    Lavino

    Lavino's infirmary sept 2017

    Seen this pop up a few times over last few weeks so thought we would get our skates on and pay a visit.the site was bigger that I was expecting. After a good look around and working a few things out and we were in. There is lots of locked doors but areas can still be accessed by taking diffrent routes. A top morning out with 2 great lads thanks again @GK_WAX and friend TOM.heres some history and photos. The Infirmary’s history can be traced back to1804 when it was just a Dispensary and House of Recovery based in Etruria. In 1819 after outgrowing its original location the hospital moved to a new site located close to Etruria Hall, an area that was densely populated with Shelton Bar, Wedgwood, Etruria Gas Works and various collieries. It was actually all of this surrounding industry that forced the infirmary to relocate once again in 1869 to nearby Hartshill, where it could be up and away from the heavily polluted area of the original buildings. The relocation actually took over 20 years due to constant conflict between the Six Towns as to where it should be sited. This was of course in the days before the towns merged to form the City of Stoke on Trent. In 2003 it was determined that under a £350,000,000 PFI development the hospitals would be rebuilt and relocated onto the City General site. Eventually in 2012 after several years of construction, the Royal Infirmary site was finally closed when all services had been relocated. url=https://flic.kr/p/Z4FSYn] [/url u [
  19. 2 points
    silver.service

    dodd selwyn motors

    with urban exploring just a distant memory well.. untill next year i would like recall some of the other explores i did but havent yet documented . i had initally planned to do the isle of axholme railway which was on my list of to do,s but with fading light plan B came into being with a trip to barry doods selwyn motors bus yard selwyn motors is a difficult yard to find set back up a drive off the main road in the lincolnshire village of belton. started by his grandfather in 1939 selwyns is an independant operator run by barry on his own predominatly a coach operator although he did have a service route 292 belton to doncaster which has ran for many years and was a saturday only 1 journey each way shopping service using the double decker which ended in december due to a new rule where the buses have to have flat platforms for disabled/buggy access added to this a cut in subsidy by north east lincs cc this rural service doesnt carry enough passengers to make buying a flat platform bus viable and with 2 way travel winning the school contracts barry in his 70,s has decided to stay with the coach hire side of the businessand was in the process of a re mot of the 53 seater to join the 49 seater available for private hire and rail replacement work. nearly every bus selwyns have ever had are at their yard many have been stood derelict for many years with trees and green moss growing either on them or around them refusing to sell his buses unless he can get the right kind of price for them it looks like a buses graveyard with the bus sheds filled with all sorts of unimaginable crap.... barry selwyn dodd gives nothing away. picture list 1, one of the original buses in the name of E.R dodd mwb 310 a 1950 bedford ob previously owned by roevilles of stainforth 2, the same vehicle parked up on the back field in belton before it was brought indoors 3, now 67 years old she stands in the bus shed surrounded by odds and ends 4, another one of dodds aquisitions was this AEC reliance 571 bwt which stands at doncasters christ church waiting to return home to belton 5, DDB 169 C a 1965 daimler fleetline new to north western as 169 shortly returning to belton via sandtoft 6, now a sad sight as it disappears into the undergrowth with the phantom conductress standing by the drivers door? 7, ex wallace arnold aua 435 j 1971 aec reliance which passed to dodds in 1976 8 &9 this vehicle is intact but hasnt run for many years seen parked in the shed another bus surrounded by assorted crap 10, OJD138 R ...a leyland fleetline fe30agr new to london transport as dms2138 in 1976 stands at christ church bus stands themselves now long since gone with the 4pm 292 service 11, another shot of the DMS with a 38 foot retford and district leyland national mk2a behind it quick bus lesson...there was a difference in the leyland national mk 1,s square front they being 44 feet with a ventilation pod on the back i once saw one go through the wrong door at yorkshire tractions upper sheffield road depot and ripped the pod clean off on the top of the door mr carter who owned YTC was somewhat livid effing and jeffing i wisely thought its time to find a bus to clean the next generation the mark 2,s had no ventilation pod on the back and a rounded front and the mark 2a,s the one pictured had a rounded front and ventilation pod and when driving them you had to remember the extra bit at the back if you got out of a mk2 and into a mk1 leyland national ( i only forgot once and knocked the mirror off one while working for jhon powells i blamed oil on my boots and my foot slipped !! ) 12 , the dms rusts in peace in the lincolnshire countryside far from its london home 13& 14, its replacement mcw mk2 metrobus F80YLV new as merseybus 810 in 1989 leaves lincolnshire far behind and heads to doncaster on the saturday only 292 belton to doncaster via epworth and sandtoft service with the end of the 292 service this vehicle has now gone to new owners 15 hsv 126 ex wallace arnold passed to wray of harrogate joined selwyns in 1994 and 23 years on it still retains its wray livery this has on one occasion filled in for the metrobus on the 292 16, the same bus under repair at selwyns yard ready for its MOT to join the 49 seater seen in the background as a private hire coach 17, 844 FKX a van hool nothing else is known about this vehicle apart from it used to do selwyns contract to axholme school before the advent of 2 way travel 18, 844 joins its companions in retirement he recently turned down an offer from a york based gentleman for this bus 19, R681 WRN formally R60 RED a volvo 49 seater was selwyns latest and possibly final aquisition leaves axholme school epworth on completing a private hire job for the school 20, volvo 681 awaits its next job parked down the field between the metrobus waiting to go to its new home and the derelict DDB 169 c
  20. 2 points
    Blacksnake would've done it in his shorts and not made a sound.
  21. 2 points
    Excellent work, You're right Snapt this is right up blober's Street and wasn't he talking about getting into video mooch in a place like this? Guided tour for you there Kurt.
  22. 2 points
    In this video me and exploring with boss are exploring the old abandoned Merthyr rail way tunnels in south wales. It was said that someone accidentally died due to being hit by a train im trying to find something on this but haven't found anything yet.
  23. 2 points
    Tbolt

    Dr Roberts, I presume?

    That is very heroic posing indeed sir, is it you? Only I can't see the gimp suit that it seems is compulsory for being underground. Top pics matie.
  24. 2 points
    I have posted the report from Milkbank House Kennels few months ago and today we're visiting the Milkbank House. Quoting BARR because I'm lazy today: Here's how this beautiful residence looked while it was still occupied: Mrs Sovieticus playing Indiana Jones: See more here:
  25. 2 points
    waveydave

    Bee Boles

    A chance find at the side of the road. From old OS maps i found the name....this is all that remains of causeway hall DSCF1465 by Tazz & Moomoo, on Flickr DSCF1472 by Tazz & Moomoo, on Flickr It looks like the rectangular chambers were some sort of cold stores but wether they were inside the hall or were out-houses i do not know. what caught my eye though was the three arched chambers just next to the store rooms. I know these to be bee boles, they were used to shelter bee hives during bad weather. Early bee hives were made of wicker and werent particularly waterproof. As honey was a commodity of some value they were often built near to the household where the hives could be protected from sweet toothed thieves. DSCF1473 by Tazz & Moomoo, on Flickr DSCF1475 by Tazz & Moomoo, on Flickr DSCF1468 by Tazz & Moomoo, on Flickr Taa for lookin
  26. 2 points
    HomoSovieticus

    Special Needs

  27. 1 point
    evilnoodle

    GONE TO POT!

    Nice to see Holdings is still going. Looks good in the snow
  28. 1 point
  29. 1 point
    porky pig

    HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE

    no that's hulme hippodrome. you should pay that a visit they're quite friendly and it's an amazing theatre.
  30. 1 point
    Lavino

    Arty images urbex/non urbex

    Ho Ho Ho Santas mine trip 2017
  31. 1 point
    Tbolt

    The Sand Sidings

    It is bloody lovely indeed good sir
  32. 1 point
    hi out mooching and refreshed on fags tea and ham sandwiches i parked myself up in a lay bay near the explore and walked the short distance to my target tickhill viaduct took a few piccies below and climbed the steps to explore on top. tickhill viaduct is the first structure trains used to cross on their way to harworth and firbeck collieries built in 1928 was part of a busy branch line that left the south yorkshire joint railway at firbeck junction to harworth colliery in 1924 the colliery was connected with a 4.2 km railway line to connect with the LNER-owned east coast main line however the ecml became very congested and a connection to the south yorkshire joint railway was considered which, also linked the new firbeck colliery see my other post with a triangle junction which would lead to another triangle junction near styrrup with lines going to harworth and another going through oldcotes and langold to reach Firbeck. The forecast for Harworth was 5000 tons per day; this would have meant even more congestion and delays so the opportunity was taken by the new owners on the SYJR LNER and the LMS to build the line to connect both collieries. This was completed in 1928. firbeck closed in 1968 and the junctions removed and with the section between harworth colliery and the east coast main line being removed the line became a truncated branch in its own right serving harworth colliery. this state of affairs continued untill harworth was mothballed in 2006 many plans were made to re open harworth and prep works insigated alas this came to nought and the demolition men sealed the shafts in 2016 and demolished the pit heads thus ending 86 years of mining at harworth. today the viaduct still stands with its trackwork complete although nature has started to take the railway back and the undergrowth can be quite fierce in places preventing further exploration further towards harworth or firbeck jcn many sections of track have been stolen 0.79 miles with a weight of 70 tons although those responsible have been caught including 3 scrap metal dealers and have served lengthy jail terms it was frustrating for network rail as they had planned to make the line operational but this was in 2008 before demolition of the pit. so whats left of the line continues in its mothballed existence the viaduct which has been reinforced with old worn out rails waiting for the return of trains who knows it could one day be a passenger line to from doncaster to harworth or a freight line depending on whats built on the old pit site and if they require a rail link but thats all speculation for the future hopefully the viaduct wont end up in the hands of the demolition men or scrap men. picture list 1, the approach to tickhill viaduct 2, tickhill viaduct left side you can see the reinforced bracing with old worn out rails 3, the right hand side of this beautifull structure with more bracing 4, the plate fastened to the bridge network rail are still responsible for its upkeep but for how much longer ? note the blue engineering bricks used in its construction 5,more pillar renforcing seen through the trees 6,on top of the viaduct looking towards harworth the rails are still existant for now 7, looking back towards the SYJR at firbeck jcn the undergrowth gets quite fierce from here and is totally impassable further up and with the collieries gone very little now uses the joint railway itself 8, further up.. the line line passes under the A60 road bridge... little bit of potted history here to the right of this picture is a layby which is very famous as a scene of the BBC,s comedy open all hours was filmed here remember the wedding episode where ronnie barker takes his trousers off in the car to get them aired?..the nottinghamshire boundry starts around a mile further on 9, the bridge plate for the A60 road bridge 10, a cant inicator lays discarded among the rusty rails 11, looking towards harworth from the other side of the A60 road bridge nature has started to take back the railway need to do the next bit from styrupp to harworth next spring 12, when coal was king a view of firbeck junction the left hand line goes to doncaster decoy jcn the right is the truncated harworth branch
  33. 1 point
    Cracking report there Sir, and 10/10 for the pics. many thanks for sharing WB.
  34. 1 point
    War buildings

    Hartford Mill, Oldham - Nov 17

    Fab report there and rather like the pics. Many thanks for sharing. WB.
  35. 1 point
    Snapt

    HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE

    That's a belting report Mr Pig. Top marks, looks good n derpy too.
  36. 1 point
    excellent, looks like they let you have a good mooch around the place
  37. 1 point
    Well done WB
  38. 1 point
    Very well indeed ta for asking
  39. 1 point
    Tbolt

    Competition 3 - Video only

    I feel the voucher should be given to me as I was the only one who correctly identified that explorey videos are shite!!! Please post it first class.
  40. 1 point
    fragglehunter

    Competition 3 - Video only

    It would seem all videos fell foul of the rules and given the lack of entries I'm a loss what to do with this voucher. If anyone has any issues speak up as I will throw the prize into a photo comp. I will leave it open to grumbles and discussion for 7 days. After that I will throw the prize at a proper photo comp unless anyone has an issue. PS no more video comps I feel..... Speak up now.
  41. 1 point
    porky pig

    Competition 3 "Stairs 'n' Chairs"

    and the winner is........................................!
  42. 1 point
    Tbolt

    Gassy

    Splendid report that. Love the pics, Really like the look of this place. Thanks for posting
  43. 1 point
    War buildings

    Bee Boles

    Great report, very informative and grand job of the pics. many thanks for sharing WB.
  44. 1 point
    Hi and a big welcome from the land of Bling, looks like an amazing explore that.WB.
  45. 1 point
    porky pig

    CARLTON THEATRE LIVERPOOL

    THE HISTORY:- The Carlton Theatre is located in the Tuebrook district of Liverpool. It is located on a prominent corner site at Green Lane and West Derby Road and externally is an outstanding building, built with brick that has white stone trimmings over the windows. It opened on 11th June 1932 with Gene Gerrard in "My Wife’s Family". Built for an independent operator, at the time of opening it was Liverpool’s largest purpose built cinema. Seating was provided for 1,280 in the stalls and 668 in the circle. The side-wall decoration was rather plain apart from plaster cast leaping stags above the circle level, a design which was copied on the original screen curtains. The proscenium arch had wings containing a series of vertical gold ribs on each side, which were lit by concealed lighting. The theatre was equipped with a stage, and dressing rooms, a Christie 3Manual theatre organ and a cafe, which had a Chinese decorative treatment. It was taken over by Associated British Cinemas(ABC) from 12th June 1935. By the end of the 1950’s the cafe had closed and the space became the district offices for ABC. The Christie organ, which was played regularly into the mid-1950’s, had been sold and removed by the end of the decade. It was re-named ABC in December 1962 and continued until 22nd January 1972 when it closed for modernisation. The rear stalls under the circle was converted into a Painted Wagon pub, which had its own seperate entrance on West Derby Road. The circle was re-seated and re-opened with 636 luxury seats. The original proscenium and the side walls were covered with a curtain material and the front stalls area was left un-used. It re-opened on 27th March 1972 with Ali McGraw in "Love Story". In 1975, the ABC was only open for evening performances and it closed on 9th July 1980 with a John Travolta double bill "Grease" and "Saturday Night Fever". However all was not quite lost as it re-opened the following day under a new name Carlton Cinema by an independent operator. Unfortunately, this was not to last long and final closure came on 4th December 1982 with Nastassia Kinski in "Cat People". The cinema has been empty and unused for the past 25 years and has become derelict, although the bar still remained open, now re-named the Lord Derby. The building was prepared to be demolished in May 2016, but by August 2017 it still stands. The Visit:- Stumbled upon this on the way home from a disappointing reece in liverpool. I love old theaters plenty character and the ghost of acts gone by! plus a bonus of a pub in the basement! all the seats had gone and it was a too risky to get to the projection room. massive stage the pub underneath pub side entrance 6.5/10 from me for this one
  46. 1 point
    Hi and welcome from Hinckley. I had ignored this place previously cos i thought it was all gone and sealed up. Time to put it back on the "to do" list
  47. 1 point
    Snapt

    Special Needs

    The cat was thankfully away, a thorough risk assessment was made before entering that door
  48. 1 point
    I don't have a feel for street photography but I had to take this one today..
  49. 1 point
    History The base opened in 1940, it was used by both the Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Forces. During the war it was used primarily as a troop carrier airfield for airborne units and as a subsidiary training depot of the newly formed Royal Air Force Regiment. After the war it was placed on care and maintenance during 1947 when the RAF Regiment relocated to RAF Catterick. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the RAF Bomber Command used Folkingham as a PGM-17 Thor Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile (IRBM) base. The Base finally closed in August 1963. Today the remains of the airfield are located on private property being used as agricultural fields, with the main north-south runway acting as hardstanding for hundreds of scrapped vehicles. The Explore Finding this place was easy enough and we were lucky enough to go on a kind of warm day for September. We spent about an hour or so walking round looking at all the different vehicles. Just as we were leaving we bumped into the woman I think owned the land walking her 3 dogs, she didn't seem too happy about people walking around taking photos, but we'd finished taking pictures and were leaving anyway. The Picture's
  50. 1 point
    Wherever I may Roam

    CARLTON THEATRE LIVERPOOL

    JESUS!!! That's well n truly fooked now ,shame coz at one time it was a little cool splore!!
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