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What got you interested in Urban Exploration?

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Hi,

 

I've been interested in Urban Exploration ever since I read Creepers by David Morrell, which I recommend if you're so inclined. I have recently read an article about a rooftop explorer that lost his life due to a fall while exploring, and I found myself wondering how people find themselves comfortable with, and then urban exploring in a roof top setting given the height, and the potential danger associated. When did you find yourself intrigued with urban exploration, and if at all, rooftopping? Also, what do you find pushes you to explore greater heights, or take on more risk when exploring? Is it simply an adrenalin rush, or is it also a way to get together with other explorers and enjoy a different type of adventure outside of the norm?

 

I haven’t been involved in any explorations that involve height, I just don’t feel comfortable putting myself in that position where the outcome is fatal, and though I can respect it from a creative point of view where the greater the height the potential for capturing great photos is increased.

 

For the time being I will stick to exploring abandon factories and houses. I’d be interested to hear your stories on what got you into this particular form of urban exploration.

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Wow, that's a profound and searching question for a new member. Firstly, hello and welcome to the forum. I look forward to seeing your adventures on here as I'm sure are the other members. As for your question, well I get nose bleeds going upstairs so heights are not my bag baby.:lol:

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23 minutes ago, Snapt said:

Wow, that's a profound and searching question for a new member. Firstly, hello and welcome to the forum. I look forward to seeing your adventures on here as I'm sure are the other members. As for your question, well I get nose bleeds going upstairs so heights are not my bag baby.:lol:

Hi Snapt,

Thanks for the reply, where have your explorations taken you so far? I am not afraid of heights so to speak. I just I prefer to keep my feet on the ground when I explore. As for where I have been so far, well, I did venture into Chernobyl :)

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15 minutes ago, Tbolt said:

Are you by chance a journalist for a living? 

 

Hi Tbolt,

I am not a journalist, though I do enjoy writing and exploring equally. For me urban exploration and writing go hand in hand, as it really gets the mind in a creative space, and writing about the locations I explore is something I find a great deal of enjoyment in. I ventured onto this forum to share my stories of exploration, which have taken me to Chernobyl, and into Pripyat - I can recommend this, don't let the radiation put you off, and also ask the question of what got others into the activity of urban exploration, where they have been so far and what motivates them to explore. I am simply looking for like-minded people who might be willing to share their stories of exploration so far, what they have encountered on their adventures and what the greatest risk taken so far in-order to sate the desire within to explore the decayed, and abandoned. I have found so far that many explorers enjoy photographing their experiences and posting it online, with those involved in rooftopping being on the extreme end of danger - it blows my mind. If you are willing to share your stories of urban exploring,  I'd enjoy reading about it.

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Had to ask sir :P

Now that must be at least number 3 on the ten sentences you don't hear very often.... "don't let the radiation put you off" lol I could do with an x-ray on my back to be honest, all this crawling around in derps has wrecked it. 

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Hello and welcome! I don’t get into heights, scares me to death and the risk is way too great for my aging body! I do love old asylums and it’s the history that surrounds these places that got me interested. As for Chernobyl, I’m planning a trip next autumn so any tips on which tour group to use would be most helpful. I do plan on staying in the exclusion zone overnight. I hear there’s a group that will take you into the power plant control room. 

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Ive been into old ruins, castles etc for many years. Then after I started seeing my current girlfriend I discovered a wealth of industrial ruins in that area. It was while researching other places like this that I learned of urban exploring. Coupled with a new found interest in photography it kind of snowballed from there. As for heights, I'm no good with them and have got worse with age. I have however found myself feeling at ease in underground places, apart from the god damn cave spiders. Aaaaaacckk! Oh yeah, and welcome to the forum

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Welcome to the forum. With me it was a natural progression from exploring derelict properties as a teenager, the pikeys made a way in, so you just walked inside. Once I had a camera they could be photographed, before being flattened forever! Nobody bothered recording mundane structures, yet they were all part of our history.

Like this derelict bank in 1966!

1WestminsterBank06121966 (Small).JPG

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I was an overprotected child told that I can't do things on my own because "someone will hurt me." I reacted by inventing an imaginary world where there were no humans left to spoil everything. I lived in a cave with a pack of dogs but just across the old farmer's field was the derelict city. I don't know why the humans left other than that I didn't want those pesky homo sapiens being there to kidnap me but everything was just left. Me and my pack regularly just walked into properties and took tins. We could sometimes sit at old tables and eat. We were friends with the cats who sat on windowsills in the city and sometimes we took stuff to the woods and partied with the wolves and foxes around a camp fire. There was a beautiful blue dragon too and he used to take me onto the top of the sky scraper and cook the best fresh caught meat you'd ever seen. Oddly, he breathed fire but was also fond of water and could go in it. Oh and I wanted to be a mermaid and explore ruined cities under the ocean/old wrecks. I still hope to scuba dive one day because I love water and swimming. I never truly grew out of this and got talking to my brother about my fascination with old buildings and wanting to sort of live out my childhood fantasy. He told me that there were people called urban explorers and I decided it was the life for me. :) 

I have since been having the childhood I've always wanted and don't intend to stop until it is impossible! Haven't explored as much as I'd like due to completing an Open University degree, ill health and finances but I have managed to visit Chernobyl twice and I got to go exploring with a beautiful pack of young dogs around an old mink farm this year, largely because I had crackers! :D I hung out with the strays at every location we visited. I had a pack at every stop and I fed them and fussed them if they told me that they wanted to be touched - ALWAYS ask first with strays and remember your dog manners if you want to keep your limbs and rabies free status! I met some lovely kitties too. I am a crazy dog/animal lady.

Have met some real arseholes I wouldn't pee on if they were on fire unless I peed petrol but mostly, people have been lovely and there are such diverse people who are attracted to urban exploration. I enjoy the social aspect of being with people also getting something out of abandoned buildings, even though I have explored things alone in the past but always told someone where I was. Exploring alone makes you feel the adrenaline/feeling sort of like an animal that could be hunted by a predator really acutely. Its a thrill but I prefer companions if possible. :)

I can't really do heights because I've had a stroke and my grip on my left side and balance is poor. I don't like anything where there's nothing to hold onto but I am not averse to ladders and stairs to the top of something if I'm capable - do appreciate a nice view. :) I managed to climb halfway up the Duga radar structure in Pripyat this October but by the final ladder to the bottom, I was wrapping my arms around the ladders because my grip had gone - good thing I got down before I became a danger to myself. Shame because it would have been an amazing view from the top. I get a bit of an adrenaline rush from exploring and because I shouldn't be there. You are on alert an awful lot but not in a damaging way. 

There is something beautiful about abandoned places. I love the bits of humanity left behind and have a fascination with post apocalyptic worlds, though I'd hate it to happen for real. I take photos but the thing that I prize most is the experience and sensory aspects of exploring. I like to touch things and smell the aroma of dereliction (Glade if you are listening, please can we have this as a plug in!). Sound is very important to me - abandoned places are peaceful but never silent, I'm scared of silence. I cherish the chorus of pigeon song, the creaks of expanding wood, the wind blowing through the corridors and those moments where you are backing onto civilisation but the world outside doesn't know that you are there. I like it when I am in a ruin on the edge of a town or city and to listen to the muffled traffic just beyond a brick wall. It is a comforting feeling of separation that is not alienating and just inspires childlike wonder, just like exploring itself.

Every time I explore, I like to take a moment to turn off my thoughts and just listen - no two moments are the same in a place and I remember in Chernobyl listening to the drumming of the rain against vivid autumn leaves. I recall thinking in that moment how every time I visit a place, it is like being privy to a magical concert that no one will hear again, the instruments of nature and decay arranged differently at every performance.  No pigeon will coo in exactly the same way at every visit, the drip dripping of water will be different dependent on how saturated the outside world has been and whether it is still raining - every symphony of dereliction is improvised beautifully with no performance ever identical.

I once heard that there was someone actually recoding the songs of the wreckage and preserving them. If anyone knows what become of them and/or links to their recordings, please let me know! Drone and dark ambient can sometimes sound evocative of derelict places, as can the ambient tracks from the old Tomb Raider games but nothing could ever match the real thing. Closest I've ever got was the Stealth album by Sleep Research Facility that was recorded in a derelict hangar. If you get hold of this CD, follow the instructions and use headphones - you're in for a treat. :)

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On ‎15‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 09:43, Tbolt said:

Err .......yes .....what she said

:mellow:

I'm brain damaged...what I write/sense/understand probably doesn't make sense to most people. :)

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7 hours ago, HomoSovieticus said:

Am I the only one here who's simply nosey?  :D

I think whoever we are and whatever brought us here, nosiness will factor into our motivations. :)

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